Cultivating Endangered Palm Tree Species from Africa

Cultivating endangered palm species from Africa and Madagascar. Today we report about the situtation and how to protect endangered species from extinction, for example by promoting and sharing important information and seeds for cultivation. You can order now different Madagascar palms, cuttings or young plants and seeds by eMail or eBay. We can ship worldwide and in Europe for lower shipping costs.

Dypsis madagascariensis is a species of flowering plant in the Arecaceae family. The palm of Madagascar is threatened by habitat loss. Dypsis madagascariensis is endemic to northern and western Madagascar. Dypsis madagascariensis occurs in moist rainforest and semi-deciduous forest up to 650 m altitude. It can be found in drier forest than most other Dypsis species, even in gullies and ravines in dry bushland. It is cultivated as an ornamental in many tropical countries. Locally it has become naturalized, e.g. in Panama. In Madagascar the wood is commonly used for floorboards of houses. The palm heart is an excellent vegetable and the fruits are edible. The palm is an attractive ornamental. The wood is very hard because of an outer layer of tough fibres. The felling intensity of Dypsis madagascariensis trees is locally high, but usually only mature trees are cut, which gives them some time to reproduce by seed. In many areas, regeneration is fair. However, as is the case with most other Dypsis spp. in Madagascar, the population of Dypsis madagascariensis has much declined as a result of forest destruction, and in national parks illegal cutting is still practised.

Dypsis comprises about 140 species, all endemic to Madagascar except 2 occurring in the Comoros and 1 on Pemba Island. The name Dypsis madagascariensis (Becc.) Beentje & J.Dransf. (1995) may be illegitimate because of the existence of Dypsis madagascariensis (Mart.) G.Nicholson (1885), which is a synonym of Areca madagascariensis Mart. Several other large-sized Dypsis species are cut for their timber used in house building, but most of these are very rare or have a very restricted distribution. The stems of some smaller-sized species are used to make blowpipes, fishtraps and bird cages. The fruits of Dypsis madagascariensis are eaten by lemurs, which disperse the seeds. The palm can grow up to 18 m tall with solitary trunk or 2–4 trunks clustering in clumps, up to 30 cm in diameter; crown shaft green, white waxy.

It is unlikely that sustainable and economically interesting production of timber and palm heart is possible from the remaining wild stands of Dypsis madagascariensis. Protection of the species has become a major concern. Its importance as an ornamental palm will probably still increase. Nursery, conservation and environmental protection projects like Greening Deserts and LE Palms (Leipzig Palms) supporting the recultivation and protections of endangered species, not just palms. We also cultivating different Baobab and mammoth trees.

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Palms Coffee for more Diversity in the Coffee Culture

LE Palms (Leipzig Palms) is proud to announce the world’s first official project and platform for a complete new coffee genre and market. The innovative project Palms Coffee in German PalmenKaffee will test and produce different coffee sorts and palm ingredients like coconut milk, dates and other palm fruits to create new coffee creations. It’s a complete new universe of coffee pleasure. Join the evolution of the coffee culture. For more creativity and diversity! www.palmscoffee.com

Coffee culture is art and peace culture. – Oliver G. C.

Chamaerops Humilis Fan Palms from Leipzig

LE Palms cultivating Chamaerops humilis and Chamaerops humilis var. cerifera in Leipzig, Germany. Other sorts can be cultivated on demand. It is a great fan palm not just for the mediterranean regions like North Africa and South Europe, it’s also a great palm for urban areans and hot cities. Palms are always good to cool down hot areas and to have more diversity for the urban greening.

Chamaerops is a genus of flowering plants in the palm family Arecaceae. The only currently fully accepted species is Chamaerops humilis, variously called European fan palm or the Mediterranean dwarf palm. It is one of the most cold-hardy palms and is used in landscaping in temperate climates. Apart from the fully accepted Chamaerops humilis, there are a few taxa of unresolved status plus numerous species synonymised under Chamaerops humilis. The species Chamaerops humilis itself has three accepted varieties as follows:

Chamaerops humilis var. argentea André (syn. C. h. var. cerifera) – “Atlas mountain palm” of Northwest Africa. Leaves glaucous.
Chamaerops humilis var. epondraes – Northwest Africa. Leaves glaucous.
Chamaerops humilis var. humilis – Southwest Europe. Leaves green.

There also are at least three cultivars (C. humilis var. humilis ‘Nana’, C. humilis ‘Vulcano’, C. humilis ‘Stella’). C. humilis ‘Vulcano’ is a compact, thornless cultivar. May be silvery, but less so than argentea. The leaves tend to be thicker, and the appearance of the plant is bushier than var. humilis or var. argentea.

Chamaerops humilis is one of only two palm species native to continental Europe, the other being Phoenix theophrasti. It is mainly found in southwestern Europe (Malta, Sicily, Sardinia, over all the Mediterranean coast of Spain and Portugal, central and southern Italy, some parts of the southern Mediterranean coast of France and Monaco, as well as northwest Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia). It is the northernmost naturally occurring palm in the world, with the northernmost standing at Hyères-les-Palmiers, at 43° 07′ N.

Chamaerops humilis is valued in gardening and landscaping in many parts of the world. It is very drought-tolerant once established. It is hardy to −12 °C (10 °F), but does prefer hot summers. It is a very slow-growing plant. The blue form of the species, native to high elevations of the Atlas Mountains, has recently been introduced into the trade and early reports indicate that it may be −12 °C (−22 °F) or more degrees hardier than the green form.

It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamaerops

Cultivation of Butia Palms in Leipzig Germany

Butia palms or jelly palms are diverse crops and useful plants. In their countries of origin, the jelly palm is grown as a crop, because the plants carry plum-sized fruits, which are suitable for direct consumption as well as for the production of jelly and marmalades. The taste has similarities to peaches and pineapple. The particularly nutritious kernels are excellent for producing animal feed but also eaten as a nut.

From single seeds up to three seedlings can grow. The frost resistance varies depending on the plant between -8 °C and -15 °C. Butia is one quite undemanding palm, which is also suitable for planting in mild areas here with us. It makes low demands on the ground, prefers a high sand content and thus good drainage, but then would like to be poured abundantly in summer. Like the origin from a very precipitous area suggests, it has no problems with wet. The substrate should always be slightly damp being held. Suitable substrate is coconut fiber substrate, vermiculite, perlite or a mixture of these three substrate types. All these substrates are germ-free and provide good moisture retention. The jelly palm prefers the brightest possible location with good sunlight. Most palm seeds germinate in reasonable conditions within one to three months. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butia

LE Palms (Leipzig Palms) cultivates the three species Butia capitata, Butia odorata and Butia yatay. These varieties are very resistant or robust and tolerate frost and a bit more cold temperatures, so they are relatively winter hardy. Winter protection themes will be described in a few more articles this year.

Butia capitata, also known as jelly palm, is a palm native to Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. This palm grows up to 8m (exceptionally 10m) in an
extremely fast manner. It is easily identifiable with feather palm pinnate leaves that arch inwards towards a thick stout trunk.
Butia capitata is notable as one of the hardiest feather palms, tolerating temperatures down to about -10 °C; it is widely cultivated in temperate climates. In the United States, B. capitata is grown along the West Coast from San Diego to Seattle, and along the East Coast from Florida to Virginia Beach, with a few known plantings north to the Long Island, NY area. Butia capitata has become naturalized in some areas of the Southern United States, from Virginia to Florida.
Ripe fruit are about the size of large cherry, and yellowish/orange in color, but can also include a blush towards the tip. The taste is a mixture of pineapple, apricot, and vanilla. Taste can vary depending on soil conditions, and the tastes of apple, pineapple, and banana together is also common. It is tart and sweet at the same time, with a flesh similar to a loquat, but slightly more fibrous. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butia_capitata

Butia odorata is native to the grasslands, and dry woodlands and savannahs of South America. Populations range across a wide area of northern Argentina, southern Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. Long pinnate leaves that arch and recurve towards the ground from atop a thick stout trunk. The trunk can grow to 20 feet, but normally reaches 12-15 ft (3.7-4.6 m) with a diameter of 1-1.5 ft (0.3-0.5 m). Trees 3-5 m tall, 40-50 cm in diam. This palm was also known incorrectly as Butia capitata for many years. The true Butia capitata was first described and named by Martius as Cocos capitata in 1826. It was discovered in the state of Minas Gerais by Martius near the town of Montes Claros and is a cerrado-loving palm endemic to the central planalto region of Brazil. It is a very different palm from the more robust coastal plane or restinga-loving “Butia capitata” of Uruguay and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
Full sun to moderate shade (the fronds grow longer in shady situations, giving the palm a more graceful aspect than those grown in full sun). Prefers sandy, well drained soil but is adaptable and very drought tolerant. Regular watering and feeding will produce a faster growing, more attractive palm. http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Butia_odorata

Butia odorata can tolerate freezing temperatures to about -15°C (5°F). It naturally occurs in open, sun exposed, montane or lowland hilly
locations, and should be planted to maximise sunshine exposure.

Butia yatay is long-lived, can grow up to 12 meters and is thus higher than most other species of the genus Butia. Her tribe is from covered with dark leaf bases. The up to 2 m long, bluish leaves are pinnate. The yellow inflorescences contain up to 100 flowers. The fruits have a diameter of 3 to 5 cm and are not edible for humans. But they attract many birds and were the main food of the probably extinct turquoise macaw. In its region of origin in the south of Brazil, Uruguay and northeastern Argentina, the Yatay palm once formed large forests. She grew up there on sandy soil. Many of them were cleared for agricultural use. The largest preserved Yatay forest is located on one area of approximately 85 km² in the El Palmar National Park in the Argentine province of Entre Ríos. Today Butia yatay is also subtropical in other Regions planted as a decorative palm. It also tolerates dry heat.

 

Palm Tree Diversity – Exotic and Hardy Palms

Over ten palm tree species are ready since last year and new sorts are coming in grow bags and boxes. In the next time we will present all sorts. We can offer a wide range of palm cuttings and 1-2 year palms – most of them are hardy down to minus 8 – 25 degree. If you need a special palm to grow no problem, we can grow nearly all palms as special order, request or service. It’s also a part of Greening Deserts projects to do important conservation work, to grow and to plant endangered plants (Red List). To cultivate rare palms ist an important goal of LE Palms. We concentrate on excotic and hardy palms.

Greening Deserts Palm and Tree Nursery from Leipzig

Today is a very special day. Together with Greening Deserts we are proud to announce the first palm nursery and tree nursery, for important and rare endangered plants (Red List), in Leipzig. Of course we will plant and research also other crops.

LE PALMS (Leipzig Palms), the official palm platform, portal, forum and group for palms was founded last year and starts now officially. The page and shop are ready and in development. We want to open the first palm cafe, lounge and palm shop in Leipzig, Saxony. Since years we have the idea to launch a palm garden and palm store – botanic gardens and parks are a speciality of Greening Deserts. Stay tuned for more news and updates. Visit the official pages for more information. http://www.lepalms.org